Douglas" squirrels cut Pacific silver fir cones in the Washington Cascades
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Douglas" squirrels cut Pacific silver fir cones in the Washington Cascades by Jerry F. Franklin

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Published by Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture in Portland, Or .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Tamiasciurus douglasii -- Washington (State),
  • Tamiasciurus douglasii -- Cascade Range.,
  • Tamiasciurus douglasii -- Food -- Washington (State),
  • Tamiasciurus douglasii -- Food -- Cascade Range.,
  • Abies amabilis -- Seeds -- Washington (State),
  • Abies amabilis -- Seeds -- Cascade Range.,
  • Pine cones -- Washington (State),
  • Pine cones -- Cascade Range.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Statementby Jerry F. Franklin.
SeriesU.S. Forest Service research note PNW -- 15.
ContributionsPacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station (Portland, Or.)
The Physical Object
Pagination3 p. :
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL16121608M

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Pacific silver fir occurs most often in areas with high precipitation and moist soils, like the mid-slope of the western Cascades. It thrives in maritime climates with high annual precipitation and average summer temperatures around 59°F. Management Pacific silver fir is dependent on adequate soil moisture during the growing season. ECOSYSTEMS: FRES20 Douglas-fir FRES22 Western white pine FRES23 Fir - spruce FRES24 Hemlock - Sitka spruce FRES25 Larch FRES26 Lodgepole pine FRES44 Alpine STATES: AK AZ CO ID MT NV NM OR UT WA WY AB BC YT BLM PHYSIOGRAPHIC REGIONS: 1 Northern Pacific Border 2 Cascade Mountains 5 Columbia Plateau 6 Upper Basin and Range 8 Northern Rocky Mountains 9 . Because of its slow early height growth, associated species such as western hemlock, Douglas-fir, and noble fir initially overtop Pacific silver fir when grown in the open. After the initial overtopping, on many sites Pacific silver fir appears to outgrow and become taller than western hemlock after years (19). Douglas' squirrels cut Pacific silver fir cones in the Washington Cascades / by Jerry F. Franklin. Portland, Or.: Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, [] SDU51 no Light thinning of Douglas-fir does not stimulate regeneration / by Norman P. Worthington and Charles F. Heebner. Portland, Or.

Squirrels cut green Douglas Fir cones–tight cones with a thick green sap-like covering–then peel them, scale by scale, leaving neat piles of bleached white tinged with pink. The thin soil of the Cascades supports trees of fantastic size and age– Douglas Fir, Western Red Cedar, Mountain Hemlock.   These fell from a grand fir. Note the shape of the tip of the bract. Each species has its unique shape. Grand fir has a broad end with a narrow tip. If you hike above feet in the Cascades, you're likely to see Pacific silver fir and subalpine fir. Pacific silver fir . The Three Sisters are closely spaced volcanic peaks in the U.S. state of are part of the Cascade Volcanic Arc, a segment of the Cascade Range in western North America extending from southern British Columbia through Washington and Oregon to Northern more t feet (3, m) in elevation, they are the third-, fourth- and fifth-highest peaks in g: US most prominent peaks, 85th (South Sister). At low and middle elevations, Douglas-fir cones mature and seeds ripen from mid-August in southern Oregon to mid-September in northern Washington and southern British Columbia. Mature cones are 8 to 10 cm (3 to 4 in) long. The bracts turn brown when seeds are mature (45).

Fruit: Small, egg-shaped cones (" long), often with a prickle at the end of each scale. May remain closed on the tree for years. Bark: Thin, dark, and flaky. Distribution: Abundant in the northern Rocky Mountains and Pacific Coast region. Grow from , ft. ( m). Douglas's squirrels were most common in 80 to y mature fir (Abies) forest compared to shelterwood cut (harvested in 2 stages with regeneration under partial canopy) or old growth forests. Most studies of northern flying squirrels in the Pacific Northwest have compared natural forest > years old (old growth) with year-old managed forest [4, 10, 39, 54]. A.   But a Douglas fir that was cut down in near Vancouver, British Columbia measured feet tall. Another tree cut down in Whatcom County in Washington in was reported to be feet tall. The tallest living Douglas fir is a foot tree growing in Coos County, taller than any conifer in the world except for the California redwoods.