Renaissance dramatic bawdy (exclusive of Shakespeare)
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Renaissance dramatic bawdy (exclusive of Shakespeare) an annotated glossary and critical essays by James T. Henke

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Published by Institut für englische Sprache und Literatur, Universität Salzburg in Salzburg .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • England,
  • England.

Subjects:

  • English drama -- Early modern and Elizabethan, 1500-1600 -- History and criticism.,
  • English language -- Early modern, 1500-1700 -- Obscene words -- Dictionaries.,
  • Bawdy poetry -- England -- History and criticism.,
  • Renaissance -- England.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Statementby James T. Henke.
SeriesJacobean drama studies ;, 39.40, Salzburg studies in English literature., 39-40.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsPR623 .H4
The Physical Object
Pagination2 v. (xxi, 345 p.) :
Number of Pages345
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL5243001M
LC Control Number75314599

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Renaissance dramatic bawdy (exclusive of Shakespeare). Salzburg: Institut für englische Sprache und Literatur, Universität Salzburg, (OCoLC) Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors: James T Henke. Courtesans and Cuckolds: A Glossary of Renaissance Dramatic Bawdy 1st Edition. By James T. Henke Septem This title, first published in , is a glossary of the bawdy vocabulary that was used in Renaissance Drama. Originally published in under title: Renaissance dramatic bawdy (exclusive of Shakespeare). Description: xxxvii, pages ; 23 cm. Series Title: Garland reference library of the humanities, v. Responsibility: James T. Henke. The Dramatic Use of Bawdy in Shakespeare book. Read reviews from world’s largest community for readers/5(6).

The Dramatic Use of Bawdy in Shakespeare Hardcover – January 1, by E. A. M Colman (Author) › Visit Amazon's E. A. M Colman Page. Find all the books, read about the author, and more. See search results for this author. Are you an author? Learn about Author Central. E. A. M Reviews: 1. His most recent book isCourtesans and Cuckolds: A Glossary of Renaissance Dramatic Bawdy (Exclusive of Shakespeare).His articles have also appeared inNeuphilologische Mitteilungen, Maledicta, Elizabethan & Renaissance Studies, Studies in Philology, andChildren's Literature. Shakespeare (London, ); James Henke, Renaissance Dramatic Bawdy (Exclusive of Shakespeare). An Annotated Glossary and Critical Essay, Salzburg Studies in English Literature, Jacobean Drama Studies, (). 2Haldeen Braddy, 'Chaucer's Bawdy Tongue', Southern Folklore Quarterly, 30 (), The complex and sometimes contradictory expressions of love in Shakespeare's works—ranging from the serious to the absurd and back again—arise primarily from his dramatic and theatrical flair rather than from a unified philosophy of love. Untangling his witty, bawdy (and ambiguous) treatment of love, sex, and desire requires a sharp eye and a steady hand.

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